One on One with Swope Health: Ruth Ramsey Feb. 2024

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring Ruth Ramsey, editor and publisher of Our Health Matters.

Eric Wesson, founder and publisher of The Next Page KC, a newspaper focused on the Black community, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing.

Ramsey, who is also president of Ramsey & Associates Design Inc., is sponsoring an event “Mentor me! I can & I will” from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24 at the Gem Theater, 1615 E. 18th St., Kansas City. The free event is a call to action for Black men to make a commitment to mentor and support Black boys.

It also is a follow-up to the November 2022 “Black Men Speak: Health, Strength, and Hope” event and special edition magazine. The magazine focused on Black men, reaffirming their value and purpose and encouraging a deeper understanding of their important contributions.

She explained the title as a call and response: “Mentor me” as a request from Black boys, “I can and I will” as the response from Black men. She also noted a dire need for Black males to serve in mentoring roles.

Her goal is to show men that they are needed and convince them they have something to contribute. Ramsey features several boys in the magazine, both who were mentored and who mentor others. “It does make a difference,” she said.

The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Gem Theater, and features:

  • Bernard Franklin, managing director of Uncornered
  • Rev. Louis E. Negron Sr., executive director and chief operating officer of 100 Black Men of Atlanta
  • Jamal Berry of Educare DC, an Early Childhood Education expert
  • Dr. L. Nathan Gause, orthopedic surgeon with University Health
  • Jeron Ravin, J.D., president and CEO of Swope Health
  • Angela and James Ward, founders of the Comprehensive Arts Institute, presenting their high school jazz band in performance
  • Eric Wesson, founder of The Next Page KC, as master of ceremonies

In addition, Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas will participate.

The event is free and open to all. Registration is requested: https://mentor-me.eventbrite.com/

 

Watch the podcast on YouTube: https://youtu.be/qE3k7E3iz2A

One on One with Swope Health: H. David Whalen

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring H. David Whalen, a financial advisor with Equity Wealth Partners.

Eric Wesson, founder and publisher of The Next Page KC, a newspaper focused on the Black community, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing.

Whalen has been a trusted financial adviser in Kansas City for more 15 years. He says his mission is to develop positive long-term relationships with clients, to help them pursue their personal and financial goals. At heart, he is an educator, guiding people on understanding and managing money.

He is a mentor to boys, working through a group he founded called Bow Ties and Ties. He also frequently conducts financial literacy classes in the community. He is a former member of the Board of Directors of Swope Health.

In this conversation, he discusses why financial education is so important. People are stressed and afraid about money, and he believes financial literacy can lessen those stresses and fears. He distills his financial planning approach to three questions:

  1. Where are you?
  2. Where are you trying to go?
  3. How are you going to get there?

He explains: “When you have the facts, you can make good decisions.” He also compares money management to Chiefs football – when the game starts, the Chiefs have a game plan. At halftime, they might make adjustments. It’s the same with your financial plan.

In the discussion, he also addresses savings (always save!), the high cost of low living (how we spend more for convenience without additional value), basics of budgeting, banking relationships and more. He encourages parents to share their budgeting and decision-making with their children so they can learn early how to manage money.

“Money is just a tool; you can manage it and control it,” he says. “Give your money instructions to do what you want, or it’ll do what it wants.”

Listen to the podcast:

YouTube: https://youtu.be/C20D5aU45CM

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-H–David-Whalen-e2fo3a6

One on One with Swope Health: Rev. Dr. Wallace Hartsfield II

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring the Rev. Dr. Wallace S. Hartsfield II, pastor of the Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church in Kansas City.

Eric Wesson, founder and publisher of The Next Page KC, a newspaper focused on the Black community, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing.

Rev. Hartsfield talks with Eric about his upbringing, education, and experiences that led up to his current position, following in the footsteps of his father, Rev. Wallace Hartsfield Sr., a spiritual and civil rights leader who worked with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Jesse Jackson, and other national leaders.

In this discussion, Rev. Hartsfield describes his approach to understanding and reducing violence in the Kansas City community. He noted the violence has a lot to do with poverty, racism, and uneven development.

“I believe one solution to this is to pray,” he said, adding that he understands some will suggest this is naïve, that prayer won’t change anything. But, he added, he’s talking about a different way of praying: “To pray is to change.”

He distilled his solution to three elements: respect, reconciliation, and righteousness. “Praying is availing and opening ourselves to love and to be loved.”

Rev. Hartsfield suggests that all the ways to address violence, poverty and social justice issues begin with a personal commitment to love.

He also describes the new initiative named after his father, a think tank for critical engagement in the issues that impact African American communities – access to education, economic equity, healthcare and employment.

Listen in to learn more:

YouTube: https://youtu.be/60jyLNgdI3E

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-Rev–Dr–Wallace-Hartsfield-II-e2doml0

One on One with Swope Health: Darrell Curls

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring Darrell Curls, Kansas City City Council member.

Eric Wesson, founder and publisher of The Next Page KC, a newspaper focused on the Black community, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing.

Curls was elected in June 2023 to represent Kansas City’s 5th Council District-at-large. He previously served on the Hickman Mills School Board for nine years and on several city commissions and boards. He is a native of south Kansas City, the Hickman Mills area, and a graduate of Longview Community College, Park College, and Central Michigan University.

In this discussion, the councilman reflects on his first nine weeks in the new role. “They throw a lot at you all at once,” he said. “It’s everything I thought it would be and more.”

He identified his top priorities as economic growth for the urban core, specifically the third and fifth districts, and addressing crime. He said he believes spurring economic growth and development can help deter crime.

Curls notes the number of homicides is alarming, as is the fact that it is young black men age 18-30 who are the most susceptible to homicide.

Tied to economic development is health, including access to fresh fruits and vegetables in local groceries. Noting that fresh groceries are lacking in the third and fifth districts, he advocates for healthy foods and educating youth about healthy foods and nutrition.

He said he believes the KC economy is on an upward trajectory. From his vantage point on the finance, governance, and public safety committees, he sees an opportunity to help drive positive investment in the city to target trash clean-up, infrastructure in the urban core, and affordable housing. He said he and his counterparts in the third district have shared goals.

He also sees positive collaboration among the new city council members and the mayor, all operating with a holistic view of the city. “We realize we can get more done by working together,” he said.

Listen to the full conversation here:

You Tube: https://youtu.be/qe_BwxT4kmE

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-Darrell-Curls-e2b51gg

One on One with Swope Health: Erik Dickinson, Urban Ranger Corps

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring Erik Dickinson, president, Urban Ranger Corps.

Eric Wesson, founder and publisher of The Next Page KC, a newspaper focused on the Black community, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing.

Urban Rangers is a non-profit dedicated to mentoring young men from the urban core, helping them develop individual talents, skills, and abilities, while growing successfully from boyhood to manhood. The program provides paid jobs as well as training for the young men, with a focus on personal responsibility, respectful work, effective interactions and making a difference through community service.

Erik, a native of Wyandotte County, discusses his 30 years of non-profit work with urban youth, from the Boy Scouts of America to YMCA to Urban Rangers. He describes how he came to this work, which he now calls “the most fulfilling job I’ve ever had.”

Erik sees himself in the young me he engages with, and that connection undoubtedly helps him in giving guidance, especially to young men from single-parent households who may not have male support.

He sees violence and anger as the major issue facing the young men he works with. “We try to teach conflict resolution. You can de-escalate anything. You don’t have to go to violence, it doesn’t have to become a violent encounter,” he said. “You can really talk your way out of most things if you’re willing to talk and just be decent.”

The violence is prevalent in society – in video games, movies and TV that show regularly show guns and brutality as common in daily life. Erik also cites easy access to guns, lack of male mentorship, breakdown of neighborhoods, and loss of neighborhood schools as “a gumbo” of factors that contribute to the rise of violence.

The Urban Rangers program helps the young men build a plan for their future, whether that involves college, learning a trade or career, being a better husband and father. Erik wants his young men to be prepared for life outside of high school and equipped to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

Listen now:

You Tube: https://youtu.be/-NPiyCzYTIM

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-Erik-Dickinson–Urban-Ranger-Corps-e29k2r4

One on One with Swope Health: Melissa Patterson Hazley

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring Kansas City Councilwoman Melissa Patterson Hazley.

Eric Wesson, founder and publisher of The Next Page KC, a newspaper focused on the Black community, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing.

Councilwoman Patterson Hazley, representing the city’s Third District at large, was elected in June. She shares that she is a Kansas City native and graduate of Kansas City Public Schools who had a longtime interest in politics, policy, and history.

She holds a bachelor’s degree in history/political science and a Master’s and Ph.D. in Educational Psychology. In addition to her career experience, she has served on several boards before running for office.

She notes that working within City Hall is a little more complicated than she expected, joking that her last couple of weeks felt like six months. But, she said, she is learning how to manage and collaborate within the systems.

She offers an example, as one of her priorities in the campaign was to clean up vacant property in the Third District, home to more than 3,000 vacant lots. In a $2 billion operation, she said she expected to be able to find $1 million for the Third District lots. She found that it would take a dozen people involved at City Hall to answer questions about the funding: which account, what restrictions, what priorities, how aligned with business and strategic plants, and so on.

“It turns out, it is a hard job,” she said, noting this priority has been in planning for two or three years. Granular detail is important in determining which types of development will work in the neighborhoods, supporting neighborhood needs without pricing residents out of the area. A goal, she said, is to remediate and build in a healthy way, for a healthy community.

She identified her No. 2 priority as Central City Economic Development, which, she noted has never been properly staffed. This sales tax district was originally organized by petition initiative and is currently without an executive director. Patterson Hazley called for additional staffing and the creation of a physical office on the East Side of the city.

This conversation also touches on police accountability, a city detention center and wide-ranging initiatives to address violence prevention with jobs, housing, healthy communities and more.

Listen here:

You Tube: https://youtu.be/J8HWf4RyUVA

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-Melissa-Patterson-Hazley-e28hdm0

One on One with Swope Health: Marquita Taylor

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring Marquita Taylor, president of the Santa Fe Area Council.

Eric Wesson, founder and publisher of The Next Page KC, a newspaper focused on the Black community, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing.

In this conversation, Eric and Marquita discuss the Santa Fe neighborhood, which is roughly bounded by 27th Street on the north, Linwood Boulevard on the south, Prospect Avenue on the west and Indiana Avenue on the east. The neighborhood covers approximately 160 acres and is listed on the Department of the Interior’s National Register of Historic Places.

The neighborhood, as Marquita relates, is the site of the homes of Buck O’Neil, the Rev. Wallace Hartsfield, and Satchel Paige.

The neighborhood today is focused on rebuilding and renovating its historic mansions, led by the Santa Fe Area Council. Meetings regularly draw 50 people or more, she said, always looking for what’s next for the neighborhood. Although the neighborhood had its share of the rising crime – 10 murders in 2022 – Marquita cites progress in 2023: funds from the city and Community Capital Fund for home repairs and renovations, tax abatements, city-supported cleanups, and a new community art exhibit.

“Neighbors are the reason we’ve been so successful,” Marquita said.

Marquita also noted the plans for the Satchel Paige home, 2626 E. 28th St., to be converted into a museum, with event space and kitchen, community space, and small business offices. The restoration and redevelopment of the family home is the subject of a $7 million campaign, just getting underway.

Marquita said the museum can help everyone treasure and understand the importance of Satchel Paige, who she called “the best pitcher of all times.”

The neighborhood is also a focal point for the KC 360 initiative, a crime reduction and community revitalization program of KC Common Good. Marquita is optimistic about the work, which has brought support to the neighborhood from associations including the Urban Rangers, Aim4Peace and Rockhurst Uncornered.

As evidence of the neighborhood’s progress, Marquita issued an open invitation:

5-7 pm Saturday, Aug. 12,
at 2801 Benton Blvd.,
for the Santa Fe neighborhood’s first art opening.
The free event features music, food trucks, and activities for kids.

“Come and be a part of what’s happening,” she said. “Let’s love on Santa Fe.”

 

Listen to the podcast:

Youtube: https://youtu.be/chhIFUC84q4

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-Marquita-Taylor-e27uc71

One on One with Swope Health: Janay Reliford and Mickey Dean, KC Reparations Coalition

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring Janay Reliford and Mickey Dean of the KC Reparations Coalition.

Eric Wesson, founder and publisher of The Next Page KC, a newspaper focused on the Black community, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing.

In this conversation, Eric invites his guests to explain the role of the KC Reparations Coalition and the Mayor’s newly formed reparations commission. The Coalition helped document the information that led to the city ordinance which authorized the commission. The commission holds the responsibility for developing recommendations to close the wealth gap in Kansas City.

Janay Reliford, chair of the Coalition, speaks to the Coalition’s focus on healthcare, housing, education, business and economics, and criminal justice. The group documented inequities that harmed Black people in each category.

Reliford notes that other groups have received reparations. “Why not Black people?” she asked.

Mickey Dean, speaking as a member of the Coalition and an advisor to the commission, brings extensive ties to the reparations movement across the nation. At the first meeting of the commission, Dean delivered an extensive presentation on the reparations movement, including a series of examples from history from 1619 to the present.

Reparations comes from the word “repair.” The goal of reparations is repair the damage of segregation and inequality. To close the wealth gap, an intervention is required.

This discussion touches on reparation initiatives in other parts of the nation, including cities like Evanston, Ill., and San Francisco, and the state of California. The conversation also addresses the impacts of mass incarceration, health injustices, educational inequalities and more, including affirmative action and myths surrounding it. The goal is to hold the city accountable for bringing reparatory justice — equality for Black people.

Oppression impacts all people. The benefit of reparations can uplift the entire community. Learn more in this conversation.

Watch the podcast:

YouTube: https://youtu.be/4HgIH77RC20

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-Jenay-Reliford-and-Mickey-Dean-e273l2e

 

One on One with Swope Health: Chris Goode

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring Chris Goode, founder and CEO of Ruby Jean’s Juicery, 3000 Troost Ave., and other locations in the Kansas City metro area.

Eric Wesson, managing editor and publisher of The Call, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing. In this conversation, Eric and Chris discuss healthy eating, and Chris relays the origin story of Ruby Jean’s – named for his beloved grandmother who died at age 61.


Chris said his grandmother didn’t trust doctors or the health care system and as a result, died of Type II diabetes, a preventable and manageable condition. When Chris discovered juice cleansing as a transformative health care tactic, he became a health care advocate and educator. The juice bar, launched in 2015, is in honor of his grandmother.

He served as a member of the Kansas City Parks and Recreation board of commissioners and was responsible for leading the charge to rename the J.C. Nichols Boulevard on the Country Club Plaza. The campaign succeeded in removing Nichols’ name from both the street and the fountain on the Plaza.

Chris discusses his earliest forms of community engagement and civic action, starting out volunteering on Janice Ellis’ campaign for mayor, supporting the Gillis Home, bringing LeBron James to Kansas City for fundraising. He describes an “insatiable appetite” to pour himself into the city.

His current initiative is the renaming of Troost Avenue to Truth Avenue. The street is currently named for Dr. Benoist Troost, the first resident physician of Kansas City and the builder of the city’s first hotel. He also was a slaveowner who owned six people. The 11-mile avenue named for him has also become synonymous with the dividing line of Kansas City, a legacy of redlining.

Chris explains his approach to making the case for the name change, starting with an educational exhibit at Ruby Jean’s. He has held collaboration sessions, virtual and in-person with stakeholders and the community, and he plans a mailing to every address on Troost Avenue. He is working with city council members to bring the change, using a petition with 15,000 signatures to rename the street.

“Truth pushes us forward,” he said. “There’s only one truth. Truth is universal, not divisive.” He argues that the name change will flip the narrative about the dividing line and serve instead to unite people.

Learn more about Chris Goode and his passion for driving positive change in this conversation.

Listen now:

YouTube: https://youtu.be/zLJWqFt4rj4

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-Chris-Goode-e25f7cp

One on One with Swope Health: Deborah Mann

Swope Health announces a new edition of its podcast, One on One with Swope Health, featuring Deborah Mann, executive director of the Emmanuel Family and Child Development Center, 4736 Prospect Ave., Kansas City.

Eric Wesson, managing editor and publisher of The Call, hosts the show’s conversations with Kansas Citians about issues of importance to the community’s health and wellbeing. In this conversation, Wesson and Deborah discuss her background and the story of the Emmanuel Center. She describes the range of services offered at the Center, which is home to a Swope Health KidsCARE clinic, and hints at her plans for the future.

In the course of the discussion, Deborah describes a tale of perseverance and resilience, and shows herself as a role model for driving positive change for children and families in Kansas City’s East Side communities.

Deborah describes how her mother cared for children in the family home, and how she too came to see childcare as her calling, understanding that quality childcare can impact the entire family. Over the 30-plus years of her career, she has built the Emmanuel Center from a daycare to a one-stop shop for family support. With the Swope Health KidsCARE clinic, the center provides pediatric, dental and behavioral healthcare plus related social support services.

She intends to expand the Emmanuel campus with a much-needed parking lot and then add a science and technology-focused facility for school-age kids as well as a job-readiness center for high school and adult family.

In this conversation, learn more about Deborah’s vision for Emmanuel Center and her drive to bring affordable housing into the area.

Listen now:

YouTube:
https://youtu.be/JxkHmAufeLc

Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/swopehealth/episodes/One-on-One-with-Swope-Health-Deborah-Mann-e24h3bk